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The world press today | AstraZeneca’s “failures” continue

T24 Foreign News

Following the recommendations of the British Medicines and Health Products Regulatory Authority (MHRA), it was decided to make Pfizer or Moderna vaccines instead of AstraZeneca’s Coronavirus vaccine under the age of 30. The Washington Post praised President Joe Biden’s administration’s success with the vaccine in the United States, but said that after two months, coronavirus cases in the United States were on the rise again. Le Monde cites China, Russia and Iran as examples, and says authoritarian governments are increasingly restricting access to the Internet.

April 8, 2021These are the headlines that stand out in the world press …

The Guardian | The decision not to take AstraZeneca until the age of 30 raises concerns about the reliability of the vaccine

Following the recommendations of the British Medicines and Health Products Regulatory Authority (MHRA), it was decided to make Pfizer or Moderna vaccines instead of AstraZeneca’s Coronavirus vaccine under the age of 30. Although the MHRA emphasizes that the AstraZeneca vaccine has serious benefits in preventing serious diseases, it has been taken because of the risk of blood clots under the age of 30. Concerns have been raised that the new warning will raise suspicions among young people about the vaccine.


Independent | There is no AstraZeneca vaccine under the age of 30

Concerns that the Coronavirus vaccine, developed by Oxford University and AstraZeneca, rarely causes blood clots, have prompted people under the age of 30 to switch to alternative vaccines in the UK. The Drug and Health Products Regulatory Authority has announced that there have been 79 blood clots in the UK so far. Prime Minister Boris Johnson said citizens should rely on AstraZeneca and other vaccines.


New York Times | Several failures for the AstraZeneca vaccine

AstraZeneca in the UK said it would not use the Coronavirus vaccine in people under the age of 30 due to its rare blood clots. The European Union’s drug regulatory agency, the EMA, said there could be a possible link between clotting and vaccination. The New York Times noted that the AstraZeneca vaccine would be the “main weapon” of the global south, which has struggled to find a vaccine, and said the developments were a major setback for the pharmaceutical company.


Washington Post | Infections are on the rise under Biden’s leadership

The Washington Post praised President Joe Biden’s administration’s success with the vaccine in the United States, but said that after two months, coronavirus cases in the United States were on the rise again. The newspaper said that the steady increase in these cases could reverse the success of the Biden administration in the first months against the virus.


Moscow Times | Lawyer: Navalny loses consciousness

Lawyers for Alexei Navalny say the health of the jailed Russian opposition leader is deteriorating.

The defense team, which visited Navalny in the prison where he was detained, said that the opposition leader began to lose his senses and continued to cough heavily.

Speaking to AFP, lawyer Olga Mikaylova said, “She looks bad and she doesn’t feel well.” The lawyer said Navalny, 1.89 cm tall, had fallen from 93 kilos to 80 kilos during a hunger strike. Another member of the defense team said that Navalny lost one kilogram a day.

Lawyer Vadim Kobzev said that Navalny also lost the sensation in his hand and “his illness is getting worse.”

Navalny went on a hunger strike last week, demanding treatment for numbness and back pain in his leg. When the opposition leader was taken to a prison hospital this week, his lawyers asked him to be taken to a “normal” hospital. The Kremlin said Navalny could not receive any special treatment.


Le Monde | China, Russia and Iran: A major internet barrier

Le Monde cites China, Russia and Iran as examples, and says authoritarian governments are increasingly restricting people’s access to the Internet. Internet restrictions, described as the Chinese model, are increasingly being accepted by other authoritarian regimes, with officials in Iran offering an Internet service completely under government control and investigating the control of foreign social media platforms. Continues in Russia.


Al Jazeera | Negotiations with Egypt, Sudan and the Ethiopian Renaissance Warehouse failed

The last meeting between Egypt, Sudan and Ethiopia on the Renaissance Warehouse did not yield results. “I tell our brothers in Ethiopia not to fall into the trap of touching a drop of Egyptian water, because all options are on the table,” Egyptian President Abdulfettah al-Sisi said after a meeting on the Renaissance Warehouse. Egypt and Ethiopia are in conflict with the Renaissance Reservoir, which has been built on the Blue Nile since 2011, raising concerns about Nile water shares in Egypt and Sudan. Egypt, Ethiopia and Sudan could not reach a conclusion on the operation and filling of the dam.

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